The August 2018 Ministry Stories feature some of the many ways that the CSJ Community works towards peace.

Join us on September 21, 2018 for the Taize Prayer for Peace and learn about other opportunities to work for peace with Twin Cities Nonviolent.

How I went to jail.


This piece originally appeared in the Fall 2009/Winter 2010 Possumus

A turning point is the moment when you change and there is no turning back for you. For me it happened when I was watching a documentary about the rise of the Nazis in Germany in the 1930s. I was working at St. Mary’s Junior College, a good Irish girl from an 80-acre farm in Jessenland Township, near Green  Isle, Minnesota.

As a young nun my life was largely about obedience, without a lot of big decisions to make. I worked in occupational therapy as well as a part- time job at the Free Store. But one day I heard a documentary about Nazi prison camps. “And the German people knew what was happening,” was the refrain.

It touched me to the core, because I knew what   was going on about two miles from here, the making    of cluster bombs, whose only function is to maim and kill. And what had I ever done about that?

2017-01-30T21:15:35+00:00
How I went to jail. This piece originally appeared in the Fall 2009/Winter 2010 Possumus.  A turning point is the moment when you change and there is no turning back for you. For me it happened when I was watching a documentary about the rise of the Nazis in Germany in the 1930s. I was working at St. Mary’s Junior College, a good Irish girl from an 80-acre farm in Jessenland Township, near Green  Isle, Minnesota. As a young nun my life was largely about obedience, without a lot of big decisions to make. I worked in occupational therapy as well as a part- time job at the Free Store. But one day I heard a documentary about Nazi prison camps. “And the German people knew what was happening,” was the refrain. It touched me to the core, because I knew what   was going on about two miles from here, the making    of cluster bombs, whose only function is to maim and kill. And what had I ever done about that? [showhide type="15" more_text="Read More..." less_text="Read Less..."] I kind of joined the peace movement, hanging around the periphery. But then there was a very   big demonstration, and the police went wild. I was standing back, afraid of being arrested. But before the day was over I did get arrested. I went over to the bus to see if Sister Kate McDonald was there. A woman gave me a note to give her housemate, to bring her ID to her.  A policeman told me I was in a prohibited area, and he tore the note to pieces. He was pushing me, and I saw a policeman pushing Sister Brigid McDonald’s face into the wall. I began moving toward her and the policeman stopped me. He kept walking on my toes, until I...

St. Joseph Workers march to end human trafficking


2017-07-07T16:43:45+00:00
St. Joseph Workers march to end human trafficking [showhide type="20" more_text="View the Video..." less_text="Hide the Video..."] [/showhide]

"Hello, Mom?"


This piece originally appeared in the Fall 2011 Possumus

After his ordeal, getting medical attention and reporting to the authorities, Justin rested a few hours before calling his  parents [to tell them about the physical and verbal abuse he endured as a victim of a hate crime].

“At first, I was shocked,” says his mother, Kathy  Caron, a Licensed Clinical Social Worker and Professional Faculty member at St. Catherine University. “Then, I felt sadness. Eventually,  I became angry; but I think my anger was more about the larger issues of stigma, marginalization, discrimination, ignorance and violence than it was at his assailants. When I considered the social implications – the injustice – I couldn’t sleep. Sitting at my kitchen table in the middle  of the night, I was scared.”
2017-03-07T19:19:44+00:00
"Hello, Mom?" This piece originally appeared in the Fall 2011 Possumus.  After his ordeal, getting medical attention and reporting to the authorities, Justin rested a few hours before calling his  parents [to tell them about the physical and verbal abuse he endured as a victim of a hate crime]. “At first, I was shocked,” says his mother, Kathy  Caron, a Licensed Clinical Social Worker and Professional Faculty member at St. Catherine University. “Then, I felt sadness. Eventually,  I became angry; but I think my anger was more about the larger issues of stigma, marginalization, discrimination, ignorance and violence than it was at his assailants. When I considered the social implications – the injustice – I couldn’t sleep. Sitting at my kitchen table in the middle  of the night, I was scared.” [showhide type="18" more_text="Read More..." less_text="Read Less..."] At that point, Kathy realized she could no longer passively support GLBT causes. It was time to get her own skin in the game. “The best way I can protect my son and other minorities is through education,” she says. “I became  a much more vocal ally. I’m now willing to be uncomfortable talking with others and recognizing my own need for  growth.” Step 1 for Kathy was to create awareness of intolerance that leads to violence. She started by sending an email blast about her son’s assault with a link to a local news feature about Augsburg student reaction to the assault. “I want to share something that has been going on for me and my family. You may have seen this on the news… the unnamed student is Justin. He is doing fine – just very overwhelmed and dealing  with  a mix of emotions.  He  is  a  solid  kid  and  resilient,  so this is not going to stop him from openly being who he is....