The September 2017 Ministry Stories are features about the St. Joseph Worker Program from various new sources over the years (including a September 2017 Minnesota Women’s Press article!). A fast growing community, the St. Joseph Worker Program empowers women committed to social change to respond to the needs of the times.

New paths to the religious life


The following article appears in the Minnesota Women's Press publication. View the original article.


Above: Mariana Arriaza, photo by Bridgette Kelly.
Below: Students from Visitation School gathered with members of the Visitation Sisters of Holy Mary, courtesy photo. 

Some had a goal of expanding spiritually. They came from a variety of faith traditions.
- Mariana Arriaza (above) says of her experience with the St. Joseph Worker Program

 

The last time many of us saw a nun in a habit was in "The Sound of Music" or "Sister Act." 
2017-09-15T16:45:20+00:00
New paths to the religious life The following article appears in the Minnesota Women's Press publication. View the original article. Above: Mariana Arriaza, photo by Bridgette Kelly. Below: Students from Visitation School gathered with members of the Visitation Sisters of Holy Mary, courtesy photo.  Some had a goal of expanding spiritually. They came from a variety of faith traditions. - Mariana Arriaza (above) says of her experience with the St. Joseph Worker Program   The last time many of us saw a nun in a habit was in "The Sound of Music" or "Sister Act." [showhide type="20" more_text="Read More..." less_text="Read Less..."] The number of religious sisters in the United States has fallen from roughly 180,000 in 1965 to less than 48,000 in 2016," according to Georgetown University's Center for Applied Research in the Apostolate. Yet a look behind those statistics reveals that women haven't disappeared from the realm of spiritually based service that so many nuns once occupied. Modern day monastery Women are "called" differently today, says Sister Katherine Mullin of Visitation Sisters of Holy Mary. They're no longer "creatures of habit" wearing black and cloistered behind monastery walls. Instead, women such as Mullin work in their communities and, in her case, doing holy work in one of Minneapolis's toughest neighborhoods. Mullin has been a nun for over 50 years and previously worked as a teacher and admissions director at Visitation School in Mendota Heights. Then, she says, "I felt a calling. The holy spirit gave me a nudge." That nudge sent her to inner city Minneapolis, where she began to assist with activities at the first sustainable inner-city monastery within the order. In 2001, she joined the four nuns who started the project. They live in two houses kitty corner from each other in North Minneapolis. "Now there are seven...

St. Joseph Workers make spirits bright while honing leadership skills


The following article appears in the Catholic Spirit newspaper. View the original article.


From left, Kiki Sykes and Ellen Klahn-Grove wrap a Christmas gift at Jeremiah Program’s St. Paul campus. Klahn-Grove is the family services manager at Jeremiah Program, and Sykes volunteers there as a member of the St. Joseph Worker Program. Dave Hrbacek/The Catholic Spirit

St. Joseph Worker Program participant Kiki Sykes knows by name the children she serves at the nonprofit Jeremiah Program, and she also knows that the ones experiencing poverty might not receive what they’re wishing for this Christmas. 
2017-07-07T16:26:25+00:00
St. Joseph Workers make spirits bright while honing leadership skills The following article appears in the Catholic Spirit newspaper. View the original article. From left, Kiki Sykes and Ellen Klahn-Grove wrap a Christmas gift at Jeremiah Program’s St. Paul campus. Klahn-Grove is the family services manager at Jeremiah Program, and Sykes volunteers there as a member of the St. Joseph Worker Program. Dave Hrbacek/The Catholic Spirit St. Joseph Worker Program participant Kiki Sykes knows by name the children she serves at the nonprofit Jeremiah Program, and she also knows that the ones experiencing poverty might not receive what they’re wishing for this Christmas. [showhide type="20" more_text="Read More..." less_text="Read Less..."] When Sykes and the eight other young women serving locally in the St. Joseph Worker Program distribute toys to the children later this month, Sykes said she’s looking forward to helping some of them feel “the joy of knowing they’re someone.” “Around the holiday season, part of the culture is gift-giving, and not every family has the resources to participate in that,” said Sykes, 22, who since August has worked in pre-admissions at Jeremiah Program, which provides support for single mothers and their children. “I’m excited to contribute.” The St. Joseph Workers participating in the 11-month immersive leadership program started in 2001 by the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet will organize and distribute about 150 new toys for children and teens at the local nonprofits where they work. The toys are left over from another nonprofit, Sponsor A Family MN, which matches families in need with sponsors who anonymously buy them gifts for the holidays. The St. Joseph Worker toy distribution, now in its fourth year, offers the women, ages 22-25, the chance to serve the community in a festive way. Usually, their full-time volunteering intensely focuses on health care, direct...

The Meaningful Life and Work of the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet and the St. Joseph Worker Program


The following article appears in the University of St. Thomas Newsroom. View the original article.



Our research began when Sister Marie Herbert Seiter, CSJ, coordinator of the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet Ministries, asked us to conduct an extensive program review of the St. Joseph Worker Program.

2017-09-15T17:01:41+00:00
The Meaningful Life and Work of the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet and the St. Joseph Worker Program The following article appears in the University of St. Thomas Newsroom. View the original article. Our research began when Sister Marie Herbert Seiter, CSJ, coordinator of the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet Ministries, asked us to conduct an extensive program review of the St. Joseph Worker Program. [showhide type="20" more_text="Read More..." less_text="Read Less..."] This program is an outgrowth, strategic-planning process in which the sisters grappled with how to sustain the mission and work of the Sisters of St. Joseph. Historically, many sisters engaged with young people in educational settings and were able to teach their values of spirituality, leadership and community while instilling a desire to work for social justice. With the aging of the St. Joseph community, and with fewer women taking vows, the sisters envisioned a program in which young women would live simply in community, grow spiritually, provide meaningful service to those in need and become leaders for social change – the four values espoused by the program. The vision of the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet, St. Paul Province, became a reality when they developed the St. Joseph Worker Program in 2002. The young women (generally 21 to 25 years old) in the program spend a year in service, living in intentional community and working 36 hours each week at nonprofit organizations throughout the Twin Cities. St. Joseph Workers (SJWs) are provided with training opportunities and other growth experiences to develop the program’s four core values. In addition, they receive housing, a monthly food budget, a small stipend and health insurance. The nonprofit settings in which the workers are placed include sites that provide English language classes for immigrant populations, shelters for women experiencing domestic...