Walking Away From Bad Knees


The debilitating arthritis in Antonio’s knees was making it increasingly painful for him to walk or stay on his feet for any length of time.  Not only was Antonio in pain, but his legs were his livelihood—he was a bus boy and needed to be able to walk and stand to get his work done. Years before, Antonio had been told at a hospital that he needed surgery, but Antonio had no insurance and couldn’t afford to pay cash for the expensive surgery.
2017-03-29T15:59:57+00:00
Walking Away From Bad Knees The debilitating arthritis in Antonio’s knees was making it increasingly painful for him to walk or stay on his feet for any length of time.  Not only was Antonio in pain, but his legs were his livelihood—he was a bus boy and needed to be able to walk and stand to get his work done. Years before, Antonio had been told at a hospital that he needed surgery, but Antonio had no insurance and couldn’t afford to pay cash for the expensive surgery.[showhide type="20" more_text="Read More..." less_text="Read Less..."] Then Antonio, a native of Ecuador, learned about a new program at the Ecuadorian Consulate, Centro Vida y Salud (CVS). CVS is a health resource center run in cooperation with St. Mary’s Health Clinics, a partner agency of United Way. At CVS, health coordinators and navigators from St. Mary’s provide health education, health screenings and referrals to free or low-cost health care. After learning about Antonio’s situation, Ioulia Peterson, a St. Mary’s health coordinator recommended that Antonio apply for assistance through Allina’s Partners Care Program, which provides financial assistance to patients who do not qualify for Medicaid or other subsidized health insurance and whose annual incomes are at or below 275 percent of the federal poverty level. Ioulia guided Antonio through the process, helping him fill out the application and gather the necessary paperwork to send to the program. Within a month, Antonio was thrilled to learn he had been approved. His knee surgery was scheduled soon after, with the cost covered by the Allina Partners Care Program. Ioulia visited him in the hospital the day after his surgery and said, “I had worked with Antonio for several months and had seen his strength of spirit and positivity, but after the surgery, I almost didn’t recognize him....

A Chance to Get His Voice Back


This story is about a St. Mary's Health Clinics patient who struggles greatly as a musician when his voice just stops.

2017-03-07T18:02:46+00:00
A Chance to Get His Voice Back This story is about a St. Mary's Health Clinics patient who struggles greatly as a musician when his voice just stops. [showhide type="17" more_text="View the video..." less_text="Hide the video..."] [video width="1280" height="720" mp4="http://csjministriesfoundation.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/Gala-2016-Clip-2.mp4"][/video] [/showhide]

"Hello, Mom?"


This piece originally appeared in the Fall 2011 Possumus

After his ordeal, getting medical attention and reporting to the authorities, Justin rested a few hours before calling his  parents [to tell them about the physical and verbal abuse he endured as a victim of a hate crime].

“At first, I was shocked,” says his mother, Kathy  Caron, a Licensed Clinical Social Worker and Professional Faculty member at St. Catherine University. “Then, I felt sadness. Eventually,  I became angry; but I think my anger was more about the larger issues of stigma, marginalization, discrimination, ignorance and violence than it was at his assailants. When I considered the social implications – the injustice – I couldn’t sleep. Sitting at my kitchen table in the middle  of the night, I was scared.”
2017-03-07T19:19:44+00:00
"Hello, Mom?" This piece originally appeared in the Fall 2011 Possumus.  After his ordeal, getting medical attention and reporting to the authorities, Justin rested a few hours before calling his  parents [to tell them about the physical and verbal abuse he endured as a victim of a hate crime]. “At first, I was shocked,” says his mother, Kathy  Caron, a Licensed Clinical Social Worker and Professional Faculty member at St. Catherine University. “Then, I felt sadness. Eventually,  I became angry; but I think my anger was more about the larger issues of stigma, marginalization, discrimination, ignorance and violence than it was at his assailants. When I considered the social implications – the injustice – I couldn’t sleep. Sitting at my kitchen table in the middle  of the night, I was scared.” [showhide type="18" more_text="Read More..." less_text="Read Less..."] At that point, Kathy realized she could no longer passively support GLBT causes. It was time to get her own skin in the game. “The best way I can protect my son and other minorities is through education,” she says. “I became  a much more vocal ally. I’m now willing to be uncomfortable talking with others and recognizing my own need for  growth.” Step 1 for Kathy was to create awareness of intolerance that leads to violence. She started by sending an email blast about her son’s assault with a link to a local news feature about Augsburg student reaction to the assault. “I want to share something that has been going on for me and my family. You may have seen this on the news… the unnamed student is Justin. He is doing fine – just very overwhelmed and dealing  with  a mix of emotions.  He  is  a  solid  kid  and  resilient,  so this is not going to stop him from openly being who he is....

St. Mary's Health Clinics is Essential


This piece originally appeared in the Summer 2016 Bold Moves for Real Change

Health care is a basic human right. The patients I have seen at St. Mary's Health Clinics (SMHC) are hardworking patients who deserve to have health care. If we can provide anything that makes their lives a little bit easier, it's important to me to do that. I've been given opportunities in my lifetime, and this is just one small way I can give back to the community and to show that I believe health care  is a basic right. 
2017-03-07T19:38:21+00:00
St. Mary's Health Clinics is Essential This piece originally appeared in the Summer 2016 Bold Moves for Real Change.  Health care is a basic human right. The patients I have seen at St. Mary's Health Clinics (SMHC) are hardworking patients who deserve to have health care. If we can provide anything that makes their lives a little bit easier, it's important to me to do that. I've been given opportunities in my lifetime, and this is just one small way I can give back to the community and to show that I believe health care  is a basic right. [showhide type="19" more_text="Read More..." less_text="Read Less..."] I see several patients each time I volunteer, and I give them some tools, medication, and a listening ear. I hope that better health care for each patient is better health care for their whole family. I see that each of us is highly connected to our community. And the healthier people are, mentally and physically, the healthier our communities are going to be. If St. Mary's Health Clinics didn't exist, patients would have to use acute care, urgent care, and emergency rooms for their health care. And not only is that not okay for the patient - they are not going to get the best care for their diabetes or high blood pressures in an ER; it is only going to be a quick fix - it is not a good way to use our resources in medicine. Patients who have chronic care need a home base and a clinic that can provide refills and prevent crises. St. Mary's Health Clinics is essential. Dr. Carla Schwartz[/showhide]